Crimes impact people of all ages, genders and races. Falling victim to a crime can shake the lives of Georgia residents. For minor crimes, this can impact one’s life initially and over time. However, for those victimized by more serious crimes, such as sexual assault, the damage caused by the criminal conduct could impact a victim for the rest of his or her life. While these damages may not be physical, they can be emotional and mental, causing major disruptions to one’s life.

Civil action following a sexual assault

While criminal laws seek to penalize an offender for their wrongdoings, civil actions seek to hold offenders liable for the damages suffered by a victim. It should be noted that the results of the criminal action is not dependent on the success of a civil suit, as the standards of proof differ.

A sexual assault is likely to cause physical and emotional damages. This traumatic experience is likely to result in PTSD, which means a victim can suffer years or a life-time of emotional damages due to this single event. When calculating the damages suffered from the incident, the details of the assault will be considered. This can help better calculate the current and future damages suffered by the victim.

Holding a third-part liable

When filing a civil suit against a person for sexual assault, monetary damages can only be recoverable if the assailant has money. In cases where a victim will be successful at a civil suit; however, the offender has little to no assets, it may be appropriate to hold a third-party liable as well. This could include an employer that failed to screen or monitor an employee or other third parties, such as a landlord, innkeeper, business, government entity, school or hospital.

The emotional turmoil experienced by a sexual assault victim can be significant and long lasting. It can be challenging to see beyond the harm suffered; however, there are ways to address the matter and even aid in the healing process. By seeking compensation through a civil suit, a sexual assault victim can address the current and future harms caused by the criminal conduct he or she fell victim to.