Recent cultural shifts have brought justice to many victims of sexual assault. Some of the most serious of these cases have happened in academia. Yet many professors accused of assault continue teaching and researching without consequence. Tenure structures at universities and colleges often protect faculty with tarnished reputations.

If your professor sexually assaulted you, your school could be at fault for not taking action to protect you – and other students. Consider these facts when working toward achieving the recourse you deserve.

Title IX can protect you

Title IX prevents sexual harassment and gender discrimination in educational settings. If a student experiences assault, harassment or discrimination on campus, both the perpetrator and the school shoulder responsibility.

By assaulting you, your assailant has violated Title IX. They thereby must receive some form of penalty for their actions. This can extend to termination or loss of tenure.

Filing a complaint is only the first step

Yet many professors who assault their students keep their jobs. And many colleges have received criticism for their handling of sexual assault complaints. Filing a complaint through your school might get you nowhere. You may have to file a complaint against them if this is so.

Former students may have filed complaints against your professor as well. Yet the institution might not have acted on them. If this is the case, then your school may be guilty of negligence.

Working toward recourse

If your professor sexually assaulted you, you might experience blowback from them – and your school – for reporting it. You do not deserve to endure this retaliation. And you have every right to recourse for the harm caused you by both your professor and your college. Working with a legal professional can help you work toward achieving the settlement and healing you desire.