The family of a man who died at a theme park has filed a lawsuit seeking damages for wrongful death. Among the issues raised in the lawsuit is whether the park had a duty to put up warning signs in Spanish. People who have been injured due to the negligence of others in Georgia might be interested in the details of the case, which raises issues related to personal injury and premises liability.

The plaintiffs in the wrongful death lawsuit are a family from Guatemala who were visiting Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Shortly after riding one of the theme park’s rides, the father of the family, a 38-year-old man, died of a heart attack. The man did not speak English and the lawsuit claims the park was negligent in not having warnings posted in Spanish.

A lawyer for the family has said it is reasonable for theme parks to post warning signs in English, French and Spanish to help park guests make informed riding decisions. The ride that allegedly caused the Guatemalan father’s heart attack has a sign outside it in English, warning people with heart problems not to ride.

The city of Orlando drew more tourists in 2017 than any other U.S. city, with 72 million people traveling there. According to tourism figures, 6.1 million of those visitors were from foreign countries. Just under 900,000 people came from Mexico, Colombia or Argentina, countries where Spanish is the most common language. Additionally, census data indicates that more than 25 percent of Florida residents do not primarily speak English.

People who are injured on the premises others might be entitled to recover for damages. In a case where a person is killed, his or her family might be able to bring claims for wrongful death. A lawyer with experience handling premises liability cases might be able to help by putting together a case for trial or negotiating a settlement with the property owner.

Source: Claims Journal, “Lawsuit Says Florida Theme Park Should Put Warning Signs in Spanish,” Mike Schneider, 01/02/2019