Some Georgia residents may have heard about a roller coaster derailment in Florida on June 14. The Sand Blaster ride at Daytona Beach had 10 people on it when the accident occurred. Two of them fell to the ground and two others were left dangling in one of the cars. In all, the Halifax Health Medical Center said it admitted nine people in connection with accident.

The ride had failed two May inspections, but those problems had been corrected according to a spokeswoman for the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The ride was also inspected on the morning of the accident and passed, but after the accident, an inspection uncovered structural deficiencies. The spokeswoman said the agency will be carrying out an investigation. No workers were injured, so the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will not be carrying out an investigation.

The riders dangling from the cars were rescued by a high-tech specialty team. The ride, which is 40 years old, was purchased in 2012 from a closed Delaware amusement park.

Some of the people who were injured in the accident might later file premises liability lawsuits against the amusement park. Property owners and managers are considered responsible for keeping premises safe for visitors, and if preventable accidents occur, they might be considered financially liable. These are not just confined to major equipment failures such as amusement park accidents. They can be as minor as a wet floor or uneven walkway that causes a person to trip and fall. Private property owners as well as business owners may also be liable as long as the victim was not trespassing.

Source: CNN, “Florida agency probing roller coaster derailment in Daytona Beach,” Jamiel Lynch, Holly Roberts, Joe Sutton, June 16, 2018