Georgia parents may be interested to learn that a 9-year-old California boy suffered minor injuries in a bounce house accident on May 12. California authorities said that strong winds caused the bounce house to fly up into the air with the child inside. It landed about a quarter mile away from the child’s backyard. It struck a car that was traveling on Highway 395; however, the boy fell out of the bounce house before the collision.

This is not the first case where strong winds have caused bounce houses to go airborne with children inside. In New York in 2014, for example, two young boys were thrown from a bounce house after it had been swept 20 feet into the air. One boy, age 5, struck his head on a parked car while the other boy, age 6, suffered broken bones after falling onto a street. Another incident that occurred in South Carolina in 2017 resulted in injuries to five children.

Experts say that in order to prevent bounce houses from becoming airborne, stakes that are a minimum of 18 inches should be used to secure the inflatable. Alternatively, sand bags could also be used to weigh an inflatable down. If the winds reach about 15 to 20 miles an hour, the bounce houses should not be used due to the wind risks.

When preventable accidents occur on someone’s property, the property owner could be held liable for any resulting injuries. For example, if a child gets hurt in an accident involving a bounce house, swing set or trampoline in another person’s backyard, the property owner could potentially be held liable. A premises liability attorney may work with the liable person’s insurance to reach a settlement for any medical costs and other damages.